Sharing.Lab thinks you should talk to strangers

Peter Just sits on Ground Floor with his company Sharing.Lab and team members Joakim and Signe. Sharing.Lab is focusing on how sharing can create relations between people in real life. Their big idea right now is to create social objects: Transform everyday objects into things that make us share conversations and experiences. So Peter, how does this concept … Continue reading Sharing.Lab thinks you should talk to strangers

Peter Just sits on Ground Floor with his company Sharing.Lab and team members Joakim and Signe. Sharing.Lab is focusing on how sharing can create relations between people in real life. Their big idea right now is to create social objects: Transform everyday objects into things that make us share conversations and experiences.

So Peter, how does this concept of social objects work?
”We live in a city with many areas we don’t use that much. Public places that are at once informal and non-commercial, like the piece of lawn across from Rainmaking Loft. We make an object social by connecting it to one of these places, and thereby design an opportunity for people to interact around the object. This summer we start out by making kits for ping-pong and crocket available across 20 locations in Copenhagen. The goal is pushing strangers to play and talk. We call it Our Hub.”

“This summer we start out by making kits for ping-pong and crocket available across 20 locations.”

That’s a nice vision, but where does the money come in?
“At the moment we are funded by the Ministry of Housing, Urban and Rural Affairs and the Environmental Protection Agency. We also seek investments from philanthropic foundations. Looking ahead Our Hub will become a platform that lets people build local communities around objects of their choice. That’s where the commercial aspect comes in. We’re going to offer people a technological package, so they can digitally tag and keep track of their things, when they are used by others.”

”Why do you believe will this work?”
”It will work, if the things you share, are of a consistent high quality. And it will work, because collective ownership gives you another feeling of responsibility for these things. We’re developing a user rating system, so it becomes visible, if you we’re the one not taking care of the neighbourhood’s crocket kit. People need to know that they depend on each other.”